Savannah Shirt

@chatterstitch shares her favourite shirt...

 
 
Hi There!
It’s Carol here, aka @Chatterstitch and I really need to tell you, all about my latest make for the Samantha Claridge Design Team!

Why? do I hear you say? Because, I absolutely love it. I requested some of this fabulous Lilac tram stripe cotton to make a Wardrobe By Me, Savannah shirt. The styling of this is so great, very classic and simple but also feminine. It’s a collarless button-down shirt with long sleeves and button cuffs.

I am really enjoying working with natural fibres at the moment especially in this lovely warm weather we are experiencing, well I suppose it is July!

So, this lovely white cotton with its strong lilac stripes was just perfect!

When my fabric first arrived, I machine washed at 40 and then line dried. It washed and pressed like a dream, just as expected from a quality cotton. 

 

What really attracted me to this fabric was the lovely tram stripe and the possibilities it gave me to play around with the stripe direction. The yolk on the savannah pattern is cut on the fold but I really wanted to have the stripes form chevrons at the centre back of the yolk, so I added an extra 1.5cm seam allowance to each centre back seam and cut the yolk as two separate halves. I used my quilting ruler to cut the first half at an angle of 45 degrees and then laid that half over the fabric so I could match the pattern for the other half of the yolk. I think it worked really well but that actually created a different challenge! 

The neck band is cut on the bias, to allow the stretch and curve around the neck, this allows the neckband to lie nice and flat. But, I realised if I cut the neckband as one continuous strip, from the front the diagonal stripe would appear to run in opposite directions, so I decided to also cut the neck band in two sections and then have those chevrons running opposite to the yolk! Yes, I know I just can’t resist the challenge!

I do think however this is one of the main reasons why I have to make my own clothes, I hate seeing people wearing stripes which don’t match or clothes which don’t fit!

I’ve really wanted to try out making my own buttons for such a long time and when I got the opportunity to make some to match my shirt, I just had to try them out. I chose the 11mm plastic ones which come as a six pack.

 

They are so easy to use, you cut a little disk of fabric slightly larger than the front then run a line of gathering stitches around the perimeter. Then pull up the gathers and knot the ends. Once its secure just pop on the little disc which holds it all in place. Et Voila!! 

 

I will definitely use these again and they come in 5 different sizes from 11mm to 38 mm in the nylon (which I used) and also metal ones which come in the same sizes. I’m not exactly sure why you would choose the metal ones over the nylon but on the website the metal ones are recommended for medium weight fabrics, so perhaps with a heavier fabric the metal ones are a bit stronger.

I really like this fabric and I love my new shirt; however, I think the fabric would also make a fabulous top or a shirt dress and there are some great ones around right now!

What would you make?

That’s all from me for now thanks for reading my little post and until next time keep chatting and stitching!

@chatterstitch

Faux jumpsuit!


Kathrine shares her jumpsuit plans

 
 
This summer, jumpsuits seem to be everywhere both ready to wear versions and sewing patterns are all over social media. Last summer I failed with a couple of versions, so I decided for my June #scdesignteam project to try a faux jumpsuit consisting of a top and matching trousers. 

 

 

For the top I decided to use New Look 6464 and for the trousers my old trusty New Look 6160. I had seen a blue stripe ready to wear jumpsuit on the high street, so I was thrilled to find the perfect blue stripe fabric in the Samantha Claridge Studio shop. 

 

 

 

 

I decided to cut the top on the bias so that I could have a chevron design with the stripes, this required some careful stripe matching, lots of pins and tacking.

 

 

 

I was struggling to get a neat hem around the curve of the neckline, so I dug in my stash and came up with this floral bias binding-I do like those pretty hidden details.

The pattern called for a ribbon fastening but instead I decided to make a fastening from the fabric. The photo here shows my first try on, there were a few alterations to come. I liked the fit and shape at the front but despite having made a toile in a different fabric which seemed ok I wasn’t happy with the back. I think the bias cut was to blame, I had a lot of excess fabric across the top of the back and it stuck out and didn’t give a flattering shape. I put it on Madeline (my tailors dummy or body double as my OH calls her!) but then resorted to putting it on and giving my OH the pins. He then videoed it for me and kept pinning until I was happy, these OHs can be useful.

 

The trousers were simpler as it’s a pattern I’ve made many times. The only change was that I had planned full length trousers but when I tried them on I wasn’t sure. I pinned one leg to a cropped length and was deliberating in front of the mirror when my 20-year-old son appeared. His definite verdict was cropped was better and more trendy-20-year-old students can be useful too! I think I wish I’d cut the pockets on the bias too to tie in with the top, but I’d already finished when I had that thought. Look at the stripe matching too, you almost don’t know they’re there.

So, the finished garments……… they don’t do what I want them to do which is look like a jumpsuit. Apparently as I’ve learned from another 20-year-old co-ords are very fashionable, to me they’re just too matchy, matchy. However, I’ve worn the top with plain linen trousers and the trousers with a plain white top and I like them both-just no jumpsuit yet!

Summer Time Separates

@missmaker shows us her summer wardrobe staples!

 
 
You may recognise this georgeous fabric from my previous project, this soft drapy cotton viscose from www.samanthaclaridgestudio.com was too beautiful! I just couldn’t tuck it away as a coat lining so I used a small amount for the yoke of the Jade jacket lining and saved the rest for a rather more summery project…

My basic idea was to cut a half circle skirt so the grain of the skirt would run across the bias and drape beautifully with lots of movement. I wanted a full length skirt so measure from my waist to floor then added 4cm to play with. My hip measurement divided by Pi (3.14 – back to school days!) gave me the diameter circle I would need, and as I wanted a half circle I used that as the radius for the waistline instead. To make the very most of the fabric I had to then spread this half circle to give me a slightly flatter curve

I also had some fantastic pale grey cuffing with a coral, pink and white stripe (also available at Sew Crafty) which I though would work perfectly as a comfy waistband, I joined the back seam and sewed the cuffing to the top, marking quarters and stretching the cuffng between to give me a stretchy waistband that still sat beautifully flat with subtle gathers when topstitched with a small zigzag.

A small rolled hem was all that was then needed to complete the skirt, so quick and easy I can see a couple more of these being whizzed up before summer is out!

Then is was on to the top half. I have a New Look pattern (6095) that I have made about 10 different variations of so far.

The fit is fab and actually works perfectly without the zip in the back so I’ve taken to cutting the back as one piece for relaxed fit versions.

I wanted two separate items that came together beautifully as one when needed to, s, once I had the basic shape together I popped it on my dress form with the skirt and thought about the proprtions of the neckline and how bind and finish it.

I opted for a sleaveless look with simple fold over binding, a laced front created using a rectangular facing turned to the outside, topstitched and used button holes with a long rouleux threaded through them (I still might change this to a cord made with emroidery thread matched to the coral stripe of the cuffing but that’s for another day)

TOP TIP: The binding on this top used one of my go to techniques for a lightweight finish. Cut a strip of binding about 5cm wide from the fabric you are using, not on the bias as this is too stretchy but at about 25 degrees. Fold the whole thing in half and press. Place the binding on the wrong side and line up your three raw edges (two for the binding one from the neck or arm hole you are binding). Stitch round the whole thing (folding your ends neatly where they join) Trim the raw edges down to about 0.5cm, fold the entire binding to the outside. Top stitch into place.  Supr neat, super light and super strong for this kind of drapey fabric.

And there we go! Time for a try on. I have just got to decide which combo is my favourite now!!!